TEL Lesson Plan
Elements and the Periodic Table

Grade Level: 10-12
Subject: Chemistry I
Time Frame: 90 minute class period. Once the information is o

Summary

This lesson is appropriate when students are about to study the structure of the periodic table. At this point, the student should be familiar with the physical and chemical properties of matter, density, atomic number, atomic mass, isotopes, and electron configuration. For this lesson, students will embark on a hunt for an element that they randomly selected based on a clue. Students use TEL to determine their element. Once they discovered what their element is, they can search for properties such as atomic number, atomic mass, density, and electron configuration for their element. This can be applied to a project on the periodic table. For example, once students know their element and related properties, they can develop a square representing that element, similar to the squares on the periodic table. Any material can be used for the squares. Left over tiles from a building project or sold in yard sales would be an excellent choice for a square.

Databases/Other Resources

Student Edition; Gale Virtual Reference Library; General Science Database; Gale Popular Magazines

Procedures

There should be a classroom set of clues (24-30). In this example, 9 clues are given.

Clue 1. A Swiss high school teacher discovered a simple mathematical relation between the frequencies of light emitted by this element.

Clue 2. The third most abundant element found on the sun. (Use

Clue 3. This element makes up both the hardest and softest material on Earth.

Clue 4. Japanese scientists found that suicide rates were significantly lower in areas with the highest amount of this element in the drinking water supply.

Clue 5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory received national attention when neutron activation analysis to study hair and nail remains of Zachary Taylor (12th President of the U.S.) did not die of poisoning from this element.

Clue 6. Considered the rarest of noble metals, it is commonly used in catalytic converters in vehicles for pollution control.

Clue 7. You might not be able to pronounce it but if you want your body to make all enzymes crucial for metabolism, you need to consume 75 micrograms of this element each day. (Use Gale Student Edition)

Clue 8. Because of its unique physical properties, many ancient scientists believed that this metal was the base element from which all metals formed. Hence, the science of alchemy originated.

(Gale Popular Magazines)

Clue 9. This miracle metal is lightweight but stronger than steel. As an alloy, it has high tensile strength, ideal for springs in delicate instruments. However, working with this metal over a prolonged period of time can cause serious lung inflammation and disease. (Use Student Edition)

Answers for teachers
1. Hydrogen
2. Oxygen
3. Carbon
4. Lithium
5. Arsenic
6. Platinum
7. Molybdenum
8. Mercury
9. Beryllium

Steps

Steps for Teacher

  • In the search results,look under the Books tab for reference materials like encyclopedias. The Gale PowerSearch - Browse Publications feature is a good place to look for publications like Chemistry Review.   
  • Using the information found in these resources, select clues for an additional 15-20 elements. 

Steps for Librarian

  • The librarian, working in conjunction with the teacher, should be able to select the search and selected terms within the clue to locate the element.
  • Searching techniques should then be taught to the students.  Selecting full-text and searching within the text under the advance search for individual databases would lead to the most success.

Steps for Student

  1. After the librarian shows students the basics of using the TEL, the students will then type in key terms from their clues under the appropriate search to find their element.
  2. Once the element is identified, the student should then search for the atomic number, atomic mass, density, physical and chemical properties, and electron configuration for that element.  This information should be easier to find. The Student Edition database and Gale PowerSearch are the best TEL collections to search.

 

In this example, 9 clues are given. 

Clue 1.  A Swiss high school teacher discovered a simple mathematical relation between the frequencies of light emitted by this element.

Clue 2.
The third most abundant element found on the sun. (Use Gale Virtual Library for this)

Clue 3. This element makes up both the hardest and softest material on Earth.

Clue 4.  Japanese scientists found that suicide rates were significantly lower in areas with the highest amount of this element in the drinking water supply.

Clue 5.  Oak Ridge National Laboratory received national attention when neutron activation analysis to study hair and nail remains of Zachary Taylor (12th President of the U.S.) did not die of poisoning from this element.

Clue 6.  Considered the rarest of noble metals, it is commonly used in catalytic converters in vehicles for pollution control.

Clue 7. 
You might not be able to pronounce it but if you want your body to make all enzymes crucial for metabolism, you need to consume 75 micrograms of this element each day. (Use Gale Student Edition)

Clue 8
.  Because of its unique physical properties, many ancient scientists believed that this metal was the base element from which all metals formed. Hence, the science of alchemy originated. (Gale Popular Magazines)

Clue 9.  This miracle metal is lightweight but stronger than steel.  As an alloy, it has high tensile strength, ideal for springs in delicate instruments.  However, working with this metal over a prolonged period of time can cause serious lung inflammation and disease. (Use
Student Edition)

Related Activities

The information obtained from this exercise can be applied to the students' squares or tiles for their elements. As the course progresses, ionization energy, electron affinity, or electronegativity may also be added to tiles.

Content Standards

Chemistry I

Standard 1 – Atomic Structure

Conceptual Strand 1: Atomic theory is the foundation for understanding the interactions and changes in matter.

 

Learning Expectations/Grade Level Expectations

Standard 1 – Atomic Structure

Learning Expectations

CLE 3221.1.2  Analyze the organization of the modern periodic table.

CLE 3221.1.3  Describe an atom in terms of its composition and electron characteristics.

 

Checks for Understanding or Learning Expectations

3221.1.5  Use the periodic table to identify an element as a metal, nonmetal, or metalloid.

3221.1.6  Apply the periodic table to determine the number of protons and electrons in a neutral atom (Atomic Number).

3221.1.7  Determine the number of protons and neutrons for a particular isotope of an element.

 

Performance Indicators State

Standard 1 – Atomic Structure

Performance Indicators

SPI  3221.1.2  Interpret the periodic table to describe an element's atomic makeup.

SPI 3221.1.3  Describe the trends found in the periodic table with respect to atomic size, ionization energy, electron affinity, or electronegativity.

 

Assessment

Library Activity Check List

 

 

Requirement

Points Available(5)

Points Earned

 

Found Element

 

 

 

Density

 

 

 

Atomic Number

 

 

 

Atomic Mass

 

 

 

A Physical Property

 

 

 

A Chemical Property

 

 

 

Electron Configuration

 

 

 

                                                                                 TOTAL _____________

ISTE Computer Literacy and Usage Standards

1. Creativity and Innovation

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.

 

3. Research and Information Fluency

Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

 

AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner

1. Inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge.

1.1.5. Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.

2. Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge.

2.1.4. Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organizeinformation.

2.4.1. Determine how to act on information (accept,reject, modify).

3. Research and Information Fluency Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information

3.1.4. Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.