TEL Lesson Plan
Population Statistics

Grade Level: 7
Subject: Mathematics
Time Frame: 1-2 class periods

Summary

Students will use an article consisting of population statistics to compute answers to questions, estimate answers to questions, create a bar graph, create a circle graph, and create a line graph.

Databases/Other Resources

Junior Edition

Procedures

Steps

Steps for Teacher

  1. Prior to the lesson, access the Tennessee Electronic Library . Under the search box, select Browse by School Grades and then select Middle School Resources
  2. Click on the Junior Edition (Gale) PowerSearch Interface
  3. Choose a country and calculate the answers to the provided questions.
  4. Create additional specific grade-appropriate questions about the graphs the students create.
  5. Create questions related to predictions. For example, “I predict that the number of people aged 65 and older will be 2 million next year in the United States. Is this likely or unlikely?”

Steps for Librarian

1. Show students how to access Junior Edition (Gale) PowerSearch Interface

2. Read the instructions for the search technique to use in the database and show students how to conduct the search or assist them as needed in conducting the search.

Steps for Student

  1. Access the Tennessee Electronic Library .
  2. Under the search box, select Browse by School Grades and then select Middle School Resources
  3. Click on the Junior Edition (Gale) PowerSearch Interface
  4. Enter the search terms nations world and select Search.
  5. Click on the tab for books in the results.
  6. This search will yield entries entitled “Nations of the world: profiles” for various countries; they are arranged alphabetically. The student should choose an entry that includes the country chosen by the teacher.
  7. Skim the article.
  8. Based on the data for the entry that includes the chosen country, calculate how many people are born each year in the chosen country.
  9. Based on the data for the entry that includes the chosen country, calculate how many people die each year in the chosen country.
  10. Which number is greater in the chosen country -- the number of births per year or the number of deaths per year?
  11. Estimate how many infants die per year in the chosen country.
  12. Answer the following question: In the chosen country, the number of infant deaths per year makes up what percentage of the total number of deaths per year?
  13. Calculate how many people are aged 15 or younger in the chosen country and in another country included in the same entry.
  14. Create a bar graph showing the number of people aged 15 and younger in the chosen country and in another country listed in the entry.
  15. Calculate how many people are aged 65 or older in the chosen country and in another country included in the same entry.
  16. Create a pie chart to show the population distribution by age for the chosen country.
  17. Answer the following question for the chosen country: What is the ratio of the number of people aged 1-15 to the number of people aged 65 and older?
  18. Based on the data in the retrieved entry, calculate how many people live in urban areas in the chosen country and in another country included in the same entry.
  19. Estimate the percentage of the population that has Internet access in the chosen country.
  20. Answer the following question: If the number of people aged 1-15 increased 10% and the number of people aged 65 and older decreased by 1%, what would happen to the percentage of people aged 16-64?
  21. Starting with the year of the data in the article, calculate the projected population to the present and for the next two years following the year for which data is provided. Let the population for a given year equal x. Let the population for the subsequent year equal y. The formula for determining a subsequent year’s population is y = x + 13x/1000. Using this formula and the population given in the article, does this formula yield a population estimate for the year after the year for which data is provided that is higher or lower than a calculation based on the given population plus the number of births minus the number of deaths?
  22. Answer the following question: If the number of people aged 65 and older is expected to be ten percent of the population for the year after the year for which data is provided, how many people aged 65 and older will there be?
  23. Graph the projected population for the year for which data is given and the next two years following the year for which data is provided.

 

Related Activities

Content Standards

Mathematics--Grade 7

Standard 5 – Data Analysis, Statistics, & Probability

 

Learning Expectations/Grade Level Expectations

Standard 5 - Data Analysis, Statistics, & Probablity

Grade Level Expectations:

GLE 0706.5.1 Collect, organize, and analyze both single- and two-variable data.

GLE 0706.5.2 Select, create, and use appropriate graphical representations of data.

GLE 0706.5.3 Formulate questions and design studies to collect data about a characteristic shared by two populations, or different characteristics within one population.

GLE 0706.5.4 Use descriptive statistics to summarize and compare data.

GLE 0706.5.5 Understand and apply basic concepts of probability.

 

Checks for Understanding (Formative/Summative Assessment):

0706.5.3 Predict and compare the characteristics of two populations based on the analysis of sample data

0706.5.4 Use proportional reasoning to make predictions about results of experiments and simulations.

Performance Indicators State

Standard 5 - Data Analysis, Statistics, & Probablity

Performance Indicators:

SPI 0706.5.1 Interpret and employ various graphs and charts to represent data.

SPI 0706.5.2 Select suitable graph types (such as bar graphs, histograms, line graphs, circle graphs, box-and-whisker plots, and stem-and-leaf plots) and use them to create accurate representations of given data.

SPI 0706.5.4 Use theoretical probability to make predictions.

Assessment

Checks for Understanding (Formative/Summative Assessment):

0706.5.3 Predict and compare the characteristics of two populations based on the analysis of sample data

0706.5.4 Use proportional reasoning to make predictions about results of experiments and simulations.

ISTE Computer Literacy and Usage Standards

1.Creativity and Innovation

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students:

a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression.
c. use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.
d. identify trends and forecast possibilities.

4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making

Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students:

a. identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
b. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
c. collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
d. use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

5. Digital Citizenship

Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students:

a. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.
b. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity.
c. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

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AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner

1. Inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge

1.1 Skills
1.16 Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning.
1.3 Responsibilities
1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly.
1.4 Self-Assessment Strategies
1.4.4 Seek appropriate help when needed.
 

 

2 Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge.

2.1 Skills
2.1.3 Use strategies to draw conclusions from information and apply knowledge to curricular areas, real-world situations, and further investigations.
2.2 Dispositions in Action
2.2.3 Employ a critical stance in drawing conclusions by demonstrating that the pattern of evidence leads to a decision or conclusion.
2.3 Responsibilities
2.3.1 Connect understanding to the real world.
2.4 Self-Assessment Strategies
2.4.2 Reflect on systematic process, and assess for completeness of investigation.
2.4.3 Recognize new knowledge and understanding.
 

3. Share knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of our democratic society.

3.1 Skills
3.1.5 Connect learning to community issues.
3.1.6 Use information and technology ethically and responsibly.
3.3 Responsibilities
3.4 Self-Assessment Strategies
3.4.1 Assess the processes by which learning was acheived in order to revise strategies and learn more effectively in the future.